Exploring The Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike

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The Abandoned PA Turnpike Pike 2 Bike Trail

The Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike is THE MOST apocalyptic hiking / biking trail in the Keystone State!

Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike Rail Trail at Rays Hill Tunnel.
Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike Rail Trail at Rays Hill Tunnel.

Thirteen miles of abandoned superhighway, last open to normal vehicle traffic in 1968.

The Abandoned PA Turnpike in Bedford County.
The Abandoned PA Turnpike in Bedford County.

Two eerily dark tunnels along the route, both roughly a mile long.

Water pooling inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
The Sideling Hill Tunnel along the abandoned PA Turnpike.

Relics of the nation’s first superhighway, now a desolate hiking / biking trail in Bedford and Fulton counties.

Looking east from the top of the Rays Hill Tunnel.
Looking east from the top of the Rays Hill Tunnel.

If all of this sounds appealing to you, follow along as I explain exactly how to find the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike, and what to expect when you visit.


Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike FAQs

How do you get to the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike?

There are two main access points. One is just outside of Breezewood in Bedford County, while the other is less than a mile from the Sideling Hill rest stop along the present-day PA Turnpike in Fulton County.View from above Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.

Can I navigate to the Breezewood parking area for the abandoned PA Turnpike by GPS?

Yes – use GPS Coordinates 39.999862, -78.228380
The parking area is along Tannery Road.
A map to the abandoned PA Turnpike parking area near Breezewood, PA.

Can I navigate to the Sideling Hill parking area for the abandoned PA Turnpike by GPS?

Yes – use GPS coordinates 40.048790, -78.095869
The parking area is just off of Pump Station Road.
Map to the Sideling Hill Tunnel parking area in Fulton County.

When was the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike built?

Ground was broken for the Pennsylvania Turnpike in October 1938, and it opened to traffic in October 1940.

Souvenir brochure for the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Why was this stretch of the PA Turnpike abandoned?

Because the two 2-lane tunnels along this stretch of the turnpike caused severe traffic back-ups as vehicles on the 4-lane highway had to merge to pass through them.
Information below from PA Turnpike exhibit at the State Museum in Harrisburg.
An informational plaque about the Sideling Hill Tunnel at the PA State Museum in Harrisburg.

When was this stretch of the Pennsylvania Turnpike abandoned?

A bypass around the tunnels and up over the mountains was opened in 1968.
Information below from PA Turnpike exhibit at the State Museum in Harrisburg.
Informational sign about the abandoned turnpike tunnels, on display at the PA State Museum in Harrisburg.

Is it legal to visit the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnike?

Yes – this section of road is slated to someday become the Pike 2 Bike Trail. Until then it is simply a non-maintained, use at your own risk trail.A sign posted near the Breezewood parking area for the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

Was the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike built on top of an old railroad?

Yes it was – the Pennsylvania Turnpike was built on top of the started-but-never-completed South Pennsylvania Railroad, which was a joint partnership between famous businessmen of the day William Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie (pictured below in front of the Rays Hill Tunnel in 1884), Henry Clay Frick, and J.P. Morgan.Image of Andrew Carnegie standing next to the Rays Hill Tunnel during initial construction.

Is it true that the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike was used to film a movie?

Yes – the 2009 post-apocalyptic survival flick “The Road” was filmed at several locations along the abandoned PA Turnpike, including the Rays Hill Tunnel.
A scene from the post-apocalyptic film "The Road", filmed at the Rays Hill Tunnel in 2009.


Exploring the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike

The Breezewood section of the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
The Breezewood section of the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

Your exploration of the 13-mile-long abandoned PA Turnpike can take place on bike or by foot (no motorized vehicles allowed).

If you want to see the entire thing, it really makes no difference which end you start at.

For the purposes of this write-up, I’m going to describe starting from the Breezewood parking area in the west.

The Abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.
The Abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.

But you could just as easily start at the Sideling Hill parking area in the east.


Locating the Breezewood Parking Area on the Abandoned PA Turnpike

As mentioned previously, you can easily navigate to the Breezewood parking area using GPS coordinates 39.999862, -78.228380.

The dirt parking lot (pictured below) is located at the intersection of Route 30 and Tannery Road.

Rays HIll Tunnel parking area on the abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.
Breezewood parking area on the abandoned PA Turnpike.

Follow the gravel path uphill from the parking area to the abandoned PA Turnpike.


Getting to the Rays Hill Tunnel

By foot or by bike, the Rays Hill Tunnel is 1.5 miles from the Breezewood parking area.

The trip is relatively flat and easy to traverse.

Gate to the Abandoned PA Turnpike trail near Breezewood.
Gate to the Abandoned PA Turnpike trail near Breezewood.

Just before reaching the Rays Hill Tunnel, you’ll cross over Mountain Chapel Road via the short bridge pictured below.

The bridge over Mountain Chapel Road near Rays Hill Tunnel.
The bridge over Mountain Chapel Road near Rays Hill Tunnel.

Once across the bridge, Rays Hill Tunnel comes into view.

The Abandoned PA Turnpike rail trail in Bedford County.
Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike trail in Bedford County.

Exploring the Rays Hill Tunnel

At 0.67 miles long, the Rays Hill Tunnel was the shortest of the 7 original Pennsylvania Turnpike Tunnels.

You enter the Rays Hill Tunnel from Bedford County in the west, and emerge in Fulton County to the east.

The image below, from the State Museum in Harrisburg, is what drivers would have seen approaching the tunnel from Breezewood in the 1940s.

The western entrance of the Rays Hill Tunnel prior to 1968, on display at the PA State Museum.
The western entrance of the Rays Hill Tunnel prior to 1968, on display at the PA State Museum.

Fast forward to today, and here’s what you can expect.

Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike
Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike

You’ll notice some of the asphalt and paint looks much fresher around the tunnel entrance.

Years after the Turnpike abandoned this section of highway, PennDOT used this road for training employees on paving techniques, line painting, rumble strip installation, and for testing new road reflectors.

Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

So don’t be surprised to see some of those features in this area around the tunnel.


Entering the Tunnel

Peering into the western portal of the Rays Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.
Peering into the western portal of the Rays Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.

Before you enter the Rays Hill Tunnel, let me give you a few tips.

Tip #1 – there is LOTS of graffiti!

Some of it tame, some very graphic and anatomically impossible in nature.

Looking towards the east from the western end of Rays Hill Tunnel.
Looking towards the east from the western end of Rays Hill Tunnel.

So if you have little kids with you, be prepared for some awkward questions and answers!

Tip #2 – it’s chilly in there!

Even in the summer you may want a hoodie or light jacket if you get cold easily.

Interior of Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA turnpike.
Interior of Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA turnpike.

Tip #3 – it’s dark in there!

While the rays Hill Tunnel is the shorter of the two abandoned tunnels on this trail, it’s still more than half a mile long.

So bring a flashlight or headlamp – you’re cellphone light won’t cut it.

Inside the Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.
Inside the Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Office at the Western Portal

Control room of the Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
Rays Hill Tunnel office along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

There are small offices at the eastern and western portals of both tunnels along this trail.

The office at the western portal of the Rays Hill Tunnel is open to easy entry, but there isn’t a whole lot to see.

Other than tons of graffiti and trash.

Graffiti inside the Rays Hill Tunnel office on the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
Graffiti inside the Rays Hill Tunnel office on the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

Still, if you’re an “urban explorer”, you’ll want to check this series of small rooms out.


Inside the Tunnel

There is no artificial light inside the Rays Hill Tunnel, but you can see one end from the other.

The inside of the Rays Hill Tunnel, illuminated by a red headlamp.
The inside of the Rays Hill Tunnel, illuminated by a red headlamp.

The photo above is illuminated by the glow of a red headlamp (easier on the eyes in dark environments).

As you make your way through and reach the eastern side (and Fulton County), you see the wide-open office entrance at that portal.

Graffiti on the walls of the Rays Hill Tunnel along the abandoned PA Turnpike.
Graffiti on the walls of the Rays Hill Tunnel along the abandoned PA Turnpike.

The office window here makes for a great photo-op.

A fellow explorer at the Rays Hill Tunnel.
A fellow explorer at the Rays Hill Tunnel.

More graffiti dominates the walls here as well.

Graffiti near the eastern portal of the Rays HIll Tunnel.
Graffiti near the eastern portal of the Rays HIll Tunnel.

Looking towards the east, you can see Sideling Hill in the distance, home of the second tunnel on this excursion.

The abandoned PA Turnpike near the Rays Hill Tunnel.
The abandoned PA Turnpike near the Rays Hill Tunnel.

An easy scramble to the top of the Rays Hill Tunnel gives you a more birds-eye view of the abandoned PA Turnpike.

Looking east from the top of the Rays Hill Tunnel.
Looking east from the top of the Rays Hill Tunnel.

One interesting feature of the eastern portal of the Rays Hill Tunnel is that it is the only portal on any of the original Turnpike tunnels that does not have a ventilation fan on top of it.

The Pike 2 Bike Rail Trail in Bedford County PA.
The Pike 2 Bike Rail Trail in Bedford County, AKA the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

Here’s how the same view shortly after the completion of the Pennsylvania Turnpike in 1940.

The eastern portal of Rays Hill Tunnel in a historical photo at the State Museum in Harrisburg.
The eastern portal of Rays Hill Tunnel in a historical photo at the State Museum in Harrisburg.

At this point you’ve traveled 2 miles along the abandoned PA Turnpike.

If you choose to continue eastward, you can expect to be at the Sideling Hill Tunnel in another 9 miles.

Graffiti along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
Graffiti along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

Or you can reverse course and retrace your steps back to the parking area along Tannery Road.

The Pike 2 Bike Trail approaching Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
The Pike 2 Bike Trail approaching Rays Hill Tunnel, along the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

From there it’s an easy 15 minute drive to the opposite end of the abandoned PA Turnpike (near the current-day Sideling Hill Service Plaza), followed by a short 1.1 mile walk to the abandoned Sideling Hill Tunnel.


Locating the Sideling Hill Parking Area on the Abandoned PA Turnpike

As mentioned previously, you can navigate to the Sideling Hill parking area at GPS coordinates 40.048790, -78.095869.

The parking area is located just off of Pump House Road, at the end of what looks like a dirt driveway.

Parking area for the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Sideling Hill parking area just off of Pump House Road on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

The parking lot itself is actually part of the abandoned Turnpike.


Getting to the Sideling Hill Tunnel

The trip from the parking area to the Sideling Hill Tunnel is roughly 1.1 miles, with an ever-so-slight-uphill grade to it.

The abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Fulton County.
The abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Fulton County.

Along the way you will pass the former Cove Valley Service Plaza, now just a large paved area that was used for a time after the closure of this section of the Turnpike as a State Police shooting range.

The old Cove Valley Travel Plaza along the abandoned PA Turnpike.
The old Cove Valley Travel Plaza along the abandoned PA Turnpike.

The old buildings and gas pumps at Cove Valley are now being swallowed up by the Earth.

Remnants of the Cove Valley Travel Plaza along the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Fulton County.
Remnants of the Cove Valley Travel Plaza along the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Fulton County.

Approximately 0.5 miles past the old travel plaza you will catch your first glance of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.


Exploring the Sideling Hill Tunnel

The eastern entrance of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.
The eastern entrance of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

The Sideling Hill Tunnel was the longest of the original seven Turnpike tunnels, at 1.3 miles in length.

The eastern portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel as pictured in a historical photo at the PA State Museum in Harrisburg.
The eastern portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel as pictured in a historical photo at the PA State Museum in Harrisburg.

Because of the tunnel’s length and the slight arc in the tunnel (to allow for proper drainage and prevent ponding water in the center), it is impossible to see one end from the other.

Interior of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.
Interior of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

That means that the Sideling Hill Tunnel is VERY dark inside, the closer you get to the center.

It does, however, make for some fantastic backlit photo-ops, if you bring your own spotlights.

A photographer illuminated by a spotlight inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
A photographer illuminated by a spotlight inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

As with the Rays Hill Tunnel, the walls of the Sideling Hill Tunnel are a virtual museum of graffiti, ranging from the mild to the wild to the downright profane.

Graffiti inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Graffiti inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Some of the more tame graffiti inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Some of the more tame graffiti inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

If you’re easily offended, you might want to keep your light focused on the road at your feet and ignore the tunnel walls.

Sideling Hill Tunnel illuminated by a hiker's headlamp.
Sideling Hill Tunnel illuminated by a hiker’s headlamp.

After what seems like forever, you’ll emerge from the western end of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.


The Western Portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel

A group of hikers entering the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
A group of hikers entering the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

The western portal is heavily graffitied and features an office you can easily enter.

Office inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel in Fulton County.
Office inside the Sideling Hill Tunnel in Fulton County.

The office doors on this side of the tunnel offer up another great photo-op.

Rusty Glessner and hiking partner at the western end of the Sideling Hill Tunnel in March 2020.
The author and hiking partner at the western end of the Sideling Hill Tunnel in March 2020.

Looking back towards the east, the darkness inside the tunnel is complete.

Western portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.
Western portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Making your way back through the Sideling Hill Tunnel to the eastern portal, one more adventure awaits on top of the tunnel itself.

The roof of Sideling Hill Tunnel.
The roof of Sideling Hill Tunnel.

The Ventilation Room

An obvious trail up the left side of the tunnel leads to the entrance of the ventilation room on top.

Looking into the ventilation room of the Sideling Hill Tunnel
Looking into the ventilation room of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

Massive fans on top of the tunnels helped force fresh air in and exhaust fumes out.

The twin fans above the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.
The twin fans above the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike.

As with the tunnel walls, the ventilation room is heavily graffitied and quite popular with urban explorers looking to leave their mark.

Ventilaltion fan above the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.
Ventilation fan above the Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.

Just off to the side of the ventilation room is the old control room.

Control room for the ventilation system on the eastern portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Control room for the ventilation system on the eastern portal of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

From here operators monitored the carbon monoxide levels in the tunnel and adjusted the airflow and fans accordingly.

Control room for the fans above the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Control room for the fans above the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

Holes in the roof mean that even indoors, the floor can be quite muddy.

The remnants of the ventilation room on top of the Sideling HIll Tunnel.
The remnants of the ventilation room on top of the Sideling HIll Tunnel.

A stairway behind the fans leads to the ventilation shafts above the tunnel.

Stairway leading to the ventilation ducts above the Sideling HIll Tunnel.
Stairway leading to the ventilation ducts above the Sideling HIll Tunnel.

These fans have been silent for more than 50 years, but the roar must have been deafening up close.

One of the two massive fans on the eastern side of the Sideling HIll Tunnel.
One of the two massive fans on the eastern side of the Sideling HIll Tunnel.

As with everything in the tunnels and along the entire length of the abandoned PA Turnpike, enter at your own risk and use extreme caution.

Caution sign outside abandoned PA Turnpike tunnel.
Caution sign outside abandoned PA Turnpike tunnel.

Final Thoughts on the Abandoned PA Turnpike

The abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike lives up to the hype!

The author inside the Rays Hill Tunnel.
The author inside the Rays Hill Tunnel.

It is arguably the most famous abandoned attraction in Pennsylvania, and certainly the largest at 13 miles long.

View from above Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.
View from above Rays Hill Tunnel along the Abandoned PA Turnpike near Breezewood.

The only thing that comes close to this, in my experience, is the Abandoned Trolley Graveyard in neighboring Somerset County.

Scenes like this are why finding the Windber Trolley Graveyard are on the bucket list of so many urban explorers.
The Abandoned Trolley Graveyard in Windber, Pennsylvania.

Unlike the trolley graveyard, the abandoned PA Turnpike is easy to legally access and safer to explore.

Graffiti on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bedford County.
Graffiti on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bedford County.

Graffiti is omnipresent, and some of it is pretty graphic (and not pictured in this write-up).

Speed Racer graffiti on top of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.
Speed Racer graffiti on top of the Sideling Hill Tunnel.

So if inquisitive kids are part of your crew, be ready to answer some awkward questions.

Someday this may indeed become an “official” rail trail, with lighted tunnels and regular maintenance.

Side view of eastern portal - Rays Hill Tunnel.
Side view of eastern portal – Rays Hill Tunnel.

Personally, I have my doubts.

The amount of money and labor needed to make these tunnels “safe” enough to insure would be enormous.

Portal of Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned PA Turnpike.
Portal of Rays Hill Tunnel on the Abandoned PA Turnpike.

And honestly, I think the “wow” factor would be diminished.

The Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.
The Sideling Hill Tunnel on the abandoned PA Turnpike.

We have plenty of “maintained” hiking / biking paths and tunnels in the state.

The Big Savage Tunnel on the nearby Great Allegheny Passage being one of them.

The well-lit and refurbished Big Savage Tunnel along the Great Allegheny Passage in Somerset County PA.
The well-lit and refurbished Big Savage Tunnel along the Great Allegheny Passage in Somerset County, PA.

I’m all for enjoying the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike just the way it is.

Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike Bike Trail near Breezewood.
Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike Bike Trail near Breezewood.

And now you know everything you need to know to do the same!


Looking for more abandoned sites in Pennsylvania?

The abandoned nuclear jet engine bunkers in the Quehanna Wild Area are a Cold War-era piece of history tucked away in Cameron County.

Abandoned nuclear jet engine testing bunker entrance.

The Abandoned Trolley Graveyard in Somerset County is a privately-owned, invitation-only scene right out of a sci-fi movie!

Scenes like this are why finding the Windber Trolley Graveyard are on the bucket list of so many urban explorers.
Scenes like this are why finding the Windber Trolley Graveyard are on the bucket list of so many urban explorers.

The abandoned Kunes Camp is an easy 2 mile out-and-back hike to the ruins of a hunting camp built BETWEEN massive boulders on the Quehanna plateau.

Kunes Camp in the spring of 2020.
The ruins of Kunes Camp in the Quehanna Wild Area.

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44 COMMENTS

  1. Wonderful, guess I traveled this road many times going from NJ to Iowa in the 40’s & 50’s. Great pictures & history.

  2. Excellent story. I have been through these tunnels back in the day when we traveled to New Jersey from Pittsburgh and back. I would love to explore them as they are, but I am afraid that I am too old to make the trip. I am glad that I traveled them before they were abandoned. I remember when the Turnpike Authority built the roads around the tunnels in order to eliminate the traffic bottlenecks. And they were major bottlenecks with many accidents of cars and trucks creating many hours of shutdown. Those of you able to make the trip, I am sure it will be worth the effort.

    • It’s really more awe-inspiring than scary. Hike it with a friend and a strong flashlight and you’ll be fine!

  3. Went thru the 7 tunnels many years ago to visit family in Blairsville. Kids fascinated by the tunnels. Thanks for letting me reminisce.

  4. Any plans to revitalize this road and tunnels for safer recreational use like bicycling, hiking or rail or trolley use for pleasure or commerce? How wasteful to just allow this area to deteriorate after all the funds piured into that project.

    • Plans – yes. Funds – no. It would cost untold millions to make this trail and those tunnels “safe” by insurance standards, which is why I have my doubts this will ever be much “safer” than it is right now.

    • I guess depending on how rugged it is, a fair amount of it. The surface is similar to a driveway or parking lot that hasn’t been maintained in many years. It’s paved, with a lot of cracks and bumps.

  5. Someone said they were going to fill this all up with dirt? Especially the tunnels? Have you heard anything about this? I would love to see this! Great Article!! Love the old abandoned history.

  6. What about the 7th tunnel, where they built the Somerset bypass? Is it accessible. That was actually the first tunnel that they bypassed, I believe. I traveled all seven tunnels many, many times, and to this day I always wonder when I pass thr places where those new bypasses split from the pld roadway, “I wonder if there’s any way to get to the old tunnels?” Thank you for finally answering that question with this beautiful article.

    • THe Laurel Hill Tunnel is now privately owned by Chip Ganassi racing and used for aerodynamic testing. Thanks for checking out the write-up!

  7. Thankyou for this great article. I too traveled this turnpike and remember all seven tunnels. I always wondered what happened to them. Perhaps I’ll make them a must see in the near future!

  8. Going Thursday with a friend, thanks for the detailed and excellent guide! Very much looking forward to this!

  9. Thanks for all the interesting info, I vaguely remember traveling through these tunnels as a kid ! We would travel several times a year from the jersey line ( Levittown) to exit 11 ( Bedford) to see family …loved your article. DS

  10. I knew the tunnels existed but never knew how to get to them or even if you were allowed. Thank you for the information.

  11. If I had the money I would love to be able to buy that piece of land in the road that leads to it that would make an awesome home.

  12. My grandmother’s farm was taken by the state to build a portion of the turnpike west of here. Our family still holds odd lots of inaccessible land along the 76.

    I love that something like this is open to foot traffic. It is fascinating to think that in Iceland there are higland-roads people use to walk urban areas. Would be wonderful to have a national walking trek that made use of these old abandon ways?

    • My grandfather helped clear land in Bedford County for the Turnpike construction (he was a timber man). Would take LOTS of work and money to make the tunnels and roadways “safe” and ADA compliant, and all the things that go into making public trails these days. I don’t see it ever happening in my lifetime.

  13. Okay, so nobody asked. I’m going to, since I’m too young to even begin to guess. What were the offices used for? I’ve seen lots of old tunnels that had them, but I never bothered to venture a guess as to what they were used for. Records keeping maybe? This looks like it would be cool to go and see. Maybe this next summer’s big trip. Great article, wonderfully written.

    • In part the offices were used to monitor safety conditions in the tunnels, in particular carbon monoxide levels, and allow adjustments the ventilation fans accordingly.

  14. Thank you for this story!!! We went and explored today because of this. It was awesome to see the tunnel and walk through them. Thank you!!

  15. Thank you for the write up. I have a toddler. Is the highway safe to travel? Any idea of what the crime rates are along the road? And is there cell service throughout? (Outside of the tunnels?)

    • It is a very popular bike trail, and cell service has not been a problem for me (using Verizon) anywhere other than inside the tunnels obviously.

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