21 Must-See Pennsylvania Rock Formations

The author in one of the canyons formed by massive rock formations along the Fred Woods Trail.

If you’re looking for the best rock formations in Pennsylvania, you’re in the right place!

Fall foliage views from Wolf Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest on October 16, 2022.
Fall foliage views from Wolf Rocks in the Forbes State Forest.

There’s a reason hikers jokingly refer to Pennsylvania as Rocksylvania – PA is home to some fantastic rock formations!

Indian Wells Overlook along the Mid State Trail in Centre County, Pennsylvania.

What follows is a guide to 21 of the best Pennsylvania rock formations that you are free to explore.


Some are incredibly tall.

Standing at the base of Rimrock Overlook along the Rimrock Trail in the Allegheny National Forest.
Standing at the base of Rimrock Overlook along the Rimrock Trail in the Allegheny National Forest.

Others are amazingly wide.

The massive Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.
The massive Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.

But ALL make for memorable day trip destinations!

Some of the fascinating tree roots at Bilger's Rocks in Clearfield County.
Bilger’s Rocks in Clearfield County.

So enjoy this list of 21 must-see Pennsylvania rock formations, and use the blue text links to view more in-depth information about each one.

Looking in the direction of Ligonier from Wolf Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.
Looking in the direction of Ligonier from Wolf Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.

1. Bilger’s Rocks

Bilger’s Rocks is part of a 170-acre community park, open to the public and located just minutes from Curwensville in central Clearfield County.

Entrance to Bilgers Rocks along Bilgers Rocks Road.
Entrance to Bilger’s Rocks along Bilger’s Rocks Road.

Billed by the Bilger’s Rocks Association (the group that owns and maintains the park) as “Pennsylvania’s Best Rock Outcropping”, this 300 million year-old natural “rock city” is a must-see for fans of geology and all things megalithic!

One of the many passageways through the boulders at Bilger's Rocks in Clearfield County, PA.
One of the many passageways through the boulders at Bilger’s Rocks in Clearfield County.

Although there are specific trails you can follow, it’s fun to wander around and explore Bilger’s Rocks freestyle as well.

Climbing through a rocky jungle at Bilger's Rocks in Clearfield County.
Climbing through a rocky jungle at Bilger’s Rocks in Clearfield County.

2. Beartown Rocks

Beartown Rocks in the Clear Creek State Forest features an exceptional scenic overlook perched high atop a “rock city” dating back to the last Ice Age!

Beartown Rocks Overlook in the Clear Creek State Forest.
Beartown Rocks Overlook in the Clear Creek State Forest.

Beartown Rocks is essentially a roadside attraction, meaning you can park right next to it and take a leisurely stroll through this “rock city” in Jefferson County.

Climbing on boulders at Beartown Rocks in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.
Climbing on boulders at Beartown Rocks in Jefferson County.

There is no “official” trail through Beartown Rocks, you can simply make your way through the rock city as you see fit.

Looking straight down from the Beartown Rocks Overlook in Jefferson County.
Looking straight down from the Beartown Rocks Overlook in Jefferson County.

3. Fred Woods Trail Rock City

The “rock city” along the Fred Woods Trail in Cameron County is a labyrinth of moss-covered canyons and crevices formed by gigantic boulders.

Hiking through the rock formations along the Fred Woods Trail in Cameron County
The author at the rock city along the Fred Woods Trail.

Equally massive hemlocks seem to defy Nature as they grow out of and up the sides of the rock formations.

Hemlock growing out of a rock formation along the Fred Woods Trail.
Hemlock growing out of a rock formation along the Fred Woods Trail.

People have been coming to see these sights along what is now the Fred Woods Trail for many, many years, as evidenced by rock carvings dating back 120 years!

Carving from 1901 along the Fred Woods Trail in the Elk State Forest.
Carving from 1901 along the Fred Woods Trail in the Elk State Forest.

4. The Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park

The Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park is touted as the best example of a boulder landscape in the eastern United States.

A lone tree standing in the Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.
A lone tree standing in the Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field is 400-feet wide, 1,800-feet long, and 10 to 12-feet deep.

Fall foliage around the Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.
Fall foliage around the Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field at Hickory Run State Park was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1967.

Hickory Run Boulder Field National Natural Landmark plaque.
Hickory Run Boulder Field National Natural Landmark plaque.

5. Moyer’s Rock

Moyer’s Rock is a massive rock formation at Lehigh Gorge State Park in Carbon County.

Moyer's Rock Overlook above the Lehigh Gorge Rail Trail at Glen Onoko.
Moyer’s Rock Overlook above the Lehigh Gorge Rail Trail at Glen Onoko.

From the top of Moyer’s Rock, you can look out over the Lehigh River and the Lehigh Gorge Rail Trail.

Moyer's Rock Overlook on an October afternoon at Lehigh Gorge State Park.
Moyer’s Rock Overlook on an October afternoon at Lehigh Gorge State Park.

While below you can literally walk THROUGH Moyer’s Rock via the abandoned Turn Hole Tunnel, built in 1866.

Soot on the roof of the abandoned Turn Hole Tunnel at Lehigh Gorge State Park.
Soot on the roof of the abandoned Turn Hole Tunnel at Lehigh Gorge State Park.

6. Jakes Rocks

 Jakes Rocks is located in the Warren County portion of the Allegheny National Forest.

Boulders at Jakes Rocks surrounded by fall foliage in October, 2021.
Boulders at Jakes Rocks surrounded by fall foliage in October, 2021.

Hiking through the boulder field known as Jakes Rocks leads to a fabulous view of the Allegheny Reservoir.

Approaching Jakes Rocks Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.
Approaching Jakes Rocks Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.

The trail to Jakes Rocks Overlook is not blazed, but is well-worn and easy to follow.

The view from Jakes Rocks Overlook on October 6, 2021.
Jakes Rocks Overlook in Warren County.

7. Rimrock Overlook

Rimrock Overlook in Warren County offers visitors outstanding views of Kinzua Bay and the Allegheny National Forest which surrounds it.

Viewing area at Rimrock Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.
Viewing area at Rimrock Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.

One unique feature of Rimrock Overlook is that you can follow a staircase down through the rocks that form the overlook!

Staricase between the boulders at Rimrock Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.
Staircase between the boulders at Rimrock Overlook in the Allegheny National Forest.

The passageway through the rocks is narrow, but there is a handrail to help you navigate the steps.

Stairway through the boulders at Rimrock Overlook in Warren County Pennsylvania.
Stairway through the boulders at Rimrock Overlook in Warren County.

8. Chimney Rocks

Chimney Rocks is an impressive rock formation with several associated scenic overlooks in Blair County.

View to the north out over Hollidaysburg from Chimney Rocks.
View to the north out over Hollidaysburg from Chimney Rocks.

Chimney Rocks derives its name from the tall, chimney-shaped limestone pillars on top of this mountain overlooking Hollidaysburg.

One of the limestone chimneys at Chimney Rocks Park.
One of the “chimneys” at Chimney Rocks near Hollidaysburg in Blair County.

According to local legend, the flat spot on top of one of the limestone “chimneys” was used as a seat/lookout by the local Native American tribal chief, earning it the name “the Chief’s Seat”.

A view of the Chimney Rocks high above Hollidaysburg PA
A view of the Chimney Rocks high above Hollidaysburg, PA.

9. Balanced Rock

A fascinating geologic anomaly caused by thousands of years of erosion, Balanced Rock seems to defy gravity as it hangs above the Trough Creek Gorge in Huntingdon County.

Rusty Glessner at Balanced Rock in Tough Creek State Park.
The author at Balanced Rock.

Once part of a cliff, Balanced Rock is the last remnant of that layer of bedrock, while the rest of that cliff slid into the gorge created by Great Trough Creek.

History of Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park in Huntingdon County Pennsylvania
History of Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park in Huntingdon County.

When viewed from the Trough Creek Drive, Balanced Rock seems to levitate above the trees below!

View of Balanced Rock from parking area at Trough Creek State Park.
View of Balanced Rock from parking area at Trough Creek State Park.

10. Beam Rocks

Beam Rocks is one of the largest rock outcroppings and most scenic mountain vistas in the Laurel Highlands of western Pennsylvania!

Beam Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.
Beam Rocks in the Forbes State Forest.

Located in the Forbes State Forest near the Westmoreland / Somerset County line, it offers a fantastic 180° view from high above the treetops and the Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail below.

Summer blooms at Beam Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.
Summer blooms at Beam Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.

In between several of the enormous boulders at Beam Rocks are crevices large enough to walk through.

A crevice between rock formations at Beam Rocks.
A crevice between rock formations at Beam Rocks.

11. Wolf Rocks in the Forbes State Forest

Wolf Rocks is another large rock formation and overlook in the Forbes State Forest.

Fall foliage views from Wolf Rocks Overlook in Westmoreland County Pennsylvania.
Fall foliage views from Wolf Rocks Overlook in Westmoreland County.

Wolf Rocks offers a 180 degree view of Linn Run State Park and Westmoreland County.

Springtime at Wolf Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest
Springtime at Wolf Rocks Overlook in the Forbes State Forest.

The rocks that make up Wolf Rocks provide plenty of places to sit and take in the view.

Wolf Rocks in the Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania.
Wolf Rocks in the Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania.

12. Laurel Caverns

Laurel Caverns is billed as “Pennsylvania’s Largest Cave”, and home to to some of PA’s best UNDERGROUND rock formations!

The overhead Grand Canyon of Laurel Caverns.
The overhead Grand Canyon of Laurel Caverns.

First discovered by Native Americans thousands of years ago, Laurel Caverns has been a popular “show cave” for many decades now.

Pillar Rock inside Laurel Caverns.
Pillar Rock inside Laurel Caverns.

Laurel Caverns is a sandstone cave (possibly the largest in the world), and therefore you won’t see any stalactites here, as you would in a limestone cave.

Chandelier Hall at Laurel Caverns.
Chandelier Hall at Laurel Caverns.

But there is an underground waterfall!

Calico Falls inside Laurel Caverns.
Calico Falls inside Laurel Caverns.

13. Baughman Rock

Baughman Rock at Ohiopyle State Park is a mountaintop rock formation high above the town of Ohiopyle.

Rusty Glessner photographing the sunrise along Baughman Trail at Ohiopyle State Park in Fayette County Pennsylvania.

Baughman Rock is also one of the most spectacular mountain vistas in the Laurel Highlands region.

Taking in the view from Baughman Rock Vista during Winterfest.
Taking in the view from Baughman Rock Vista during Winterfest.

Baughman Rock offers tremendous bang for your buck – miles of views just a few yards from a roadside parking area.

The fence at Baughman Rock Overlook.
The fence at Baughman Rock Overlook.

14. Baughman Rocks

Baughman Rocks (not to be confused with Baughman Rock) is a fascinating rock formation located on Mount Davis, the highest point in Pennsylvania.

The view of Baughman Rocks on Mount Davis from the observation deck.
Baughman Rocks on Mount Davis.

Baughman Rocks has a rather macabre history associated with it, which you can read about on an informational sign nearby.

History of Baughman Rocks on Mount Davis in Somerset County
The somewhat ominous history of Baughman Rocks on Mount Davis in Somerset County.

Upon closer inspection you can certainly see how a body could “disappear” in these deep crevices between the boulders.

Baughman Rocks in Somerset County Pennsylvania.
Baughman Rocks in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

15. Indian Wells

Indian Wells is an exceptional rock formation and scenic vista located right along the Mid State Trail near the Centre-Huntingdon county line.

Indian Wells Overlook along the Mid State Trail in early November.
Indian Wells Overlook along the Mid State Trail in early November.

Indian Wells is nearly 130 yards wide.

Indian Wells Overlook in Centre County, PA on a November morning.
Indian Wells Overlook in Centre County, PA on a November morning.

And while it’s beautiful year-round, the views from Indian Wells in October are some of the finest in Centre County.

Rusty Glessner at Indian Wells Overlook in Centre County Pennsylvania

16. Ticklish Rock

Ticklish Rock is a gravity-defying sandstone pillar on a forested plateau in Sullivan County.

Ticklish Rock in March 2022.
Ticklish Rock in March 2022.

Resembling an upright hammer, this natural anomaly is an example of differential weathering.

Looking up at Ticklish Rock from the hillside below.
Looking up at Ticklish Rock from the hillside below.

The name “Ticklish Rock” is a reference to the rumor that the rock will wiggle if you push on the pedestal – I have not tried that and DO NOT encourage you to do so either!

Looking down on Ticklish Rock in Sullivan County Pennsylvania.
Looking down on Ticklish Rock.

17. Wolf Rocks in the Gallitzin State Forest

Wolf Rocks is a beautiful geological formation located along the orange-blazed John P. Saylor Trail in the Somerset County portion of the Gallitzin State Forest.

The view from Wolf Rocks, looking to the southwest in the Gallitzin State Forest.
The view from Wolf Rocks, looking to the southwest in the Gallitzin State Forest.

Wolf Rocks is an oblong-shaped formation of boulders that seem to jut up from the Earth to heights as great as 30 feet above the surrounding forest.

Moss covered boulders at Wolf Rocks in the Gallitzin State Forest.
Moss covered boulders at Wolf Rocks.

Use caution as you explore the top of Wolf Rocks, especially if you choose to step over some of the smaller crevasses.

Wolf Rocks along the John P Saylor Trail in Somerset County Pennsylvania.
Wolf Rocks along the John P Saylor Trail.

18. The Devil’s Den at Gettysburg

There is perhaps no Pennsylvania rock formation more famous than the Devil’s Den.

Devil's Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.
Devil’s Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.

Located on the battlefield at the Gettysburg National Military Park, this jumbled mass of large volcanic boulders became the scene of intense and bloody infantry fighting on the second day of the battle.

Looking east towards Little Round Top from Devil's Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.
Looking east towards Little Round Top from Devil’s Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.

One of the most famous photos of the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg was taken at the Devil’s Den.

An informational sign about Civil Was photography featuring the image of a deceased Confederate sharpshooter at Devil's Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.
An informational sign about Civil Was photography featuring the image of a deceased Confederate sharpshooter at Devil’s Den on the Gettysburg battlefield.

Today the scene at that exact spot is eerily similar.

The spot at Devil's Den where one of the most famous photos taken after the Battle of Gettysburg was created.
The spot at Devil’s Den where one of the most famous photos taken after the Battle of Gettysburg was created.

19. The Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park

The Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park is located directly across from Loyalsock Canyon Vista, along Cold Run Road.

The Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park is located directly across from Loyalsock Canyon Vista.
The Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park is located directly across from Loyalsock Canyon Vista..

The boulders that form the Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park are part of the Pottsville Formation dating back roughly 300 million years to the Pennsylvanian geologic period.

The boulders that form the Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park are part of the Pottsville Formation dating back roughly 300 million years to the Pennsylvanian geologic period.
The boulders that form the Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park are part of the Pottsville Formation dating back roughly 300 million years to the Pennsylvanian geologic period.

Here you can walk on, around, and through the various boulder formations that make up the Rock Garden.

Boulders in the Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park.
Boulders in the Rock Garden at Worlds End State Park.

20. Schull’s Rock

Schull’s Rock Overlook is a fantastic rock outcropping and vista on the west bank of the Susquehanna River, located in one of PA’s newest state parks (added in 2022).

Looking upstream along the Susquehanna River from Schull's Rock Overlook at Susquehanna Riverlands State Park.
Looking upstream along the Susquehanna River from Schull’s Rock Overlook.

To the south your views from Schull’s Rock are downstream along the Susquehanna River, in the direction of Wrightsville (York County) and Columbia (Lancaster County).

View to the southeast from Schull's Rock Overlook at Susquehanna Riverlands State Park.
View to the southeast.

While to the north the view from Schull’s Rock Overlook is of Shocks Mills Bridge, with Codorus Creek spilling into the Susquehanna River just above the bridge.

View to the north from Schull's Rock Overlook at Susquehanna Riverlands State Park in York County Pennsylvania.
View to the north from Schull’s Rock Overlook.

21. Chickies Rock

Chickies Rock is one of the most popular scenic overlooks along the eastern side of the Susquehanna River, a towering rock outcropping more than 100 feet above the river.

A summer afternoon at Chickies Rock along the eastern shore of the Susquehanna River in Lancaster County Pennsylvania.
A summer afternoon at Chickies Rock along the eastern shore of the Susquehanna River.

Originally called “Chiques Rock”, the name of the overlook is derived from the Native American word Chiquesalunga, meaning “place of the crayfish.”  

Chickies Rock County Park in Lancaster County Pennsylvania.
Chickies Rock County Park.

This magnificent overlook is accessed via a 0.5 mile long, relatively flat hike along an old trolley grade, beginning at a parking area along Route 441 and ending at Chickies Rock.

Chickies Rock sign next to the parking lot along Route 441 in Lancaster County Pennsylvania.
Chickies Rock sign next to the parking lot along Route 441.

So there you have it – 21 must-see Pennsylvania rock formations!

Taking in the scene at Bilger's Rocks in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania.
Taking in the scene at Bilger’s Rocks in Clearfield County.

If you’re looking for more PA natural attractions to explore, check out 20 Must-See Pennsylvania Waterfalls.

Fall foliage at Cucumber Falls at Ohiopyle State Park.
Fall foliage around Cucumber Falls at Ohiopyle State Park.

If scenic overlooks are your cup of tea, be sure to check out my Scenic Overlooks page with directions to more than 100 great scenic overlooks in Pennsylvania!

A comprehensive guide to the best scenic overlooks in Pennsylvania.
Directions to more than 100 scenic overlooks all across Pennsylvania.

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Rusty Glessner
Rusty Glessner is a professional photographer, lifelong Pennsylvanian, and a frequently-cited authority on PA's best travel destinations.